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Nativen is an American heritage workwear brand, for hands-on women with know how. 

From our curated collection of vintage pieces to our thoughtfully crafted USA-made workwear,  we are passionate about providing you with the kind of products you will love to live and work in.

We believe that you don't need more stuff. You need better stuff.

 

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Filtering by Tag: woodworker

Natalie Shook: Supersmith

Lily Hetzler

There’s something to be said about people who throw all sense of convention out the window, and follow what compels them.  Natalie Shook, is one such woman.  When you step into the storefront cum collective maker haven that she and her partner have created, in Supersmith, it’s instantly clear that beauty is more about the process for her.   A true hands on woman who takes inspiration from her past, and pushes it into the future through her community driven space.  This is collaboration at it’s finest and I can’t wait to see where she takes it.  Jump on the wagon and take a tour through Natalie’s evolution and the building of a beautiful brand.

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Nativen:  Do you think growing up where you did in Cleveland had any effect on your choice to become a woodworker and painter?

Natalie:   Yeah. You know, my parents were always super supportive of me. You know, I came here for painting, and I pursued that really heavily from when I was young, you know, like maybe 15, I started painting seriously. They were super supportive, but I guess I was doing sculpture at the time. My grandparents lived just a few blocks away. My grandfather had a wood shop in his basement, like men did, you know?
He had this tool chest, which his father built so my great grandfather.

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Nativen:  Oh, that's beautiful.

Natalie:  So I played with all these tools when I was a kid, and my parents were amazing. 
My grandparents had passed, but they kept the house. So they would let me live in their house alone on the weekends. And so I would just like hang out in the shop and build stuff. Now that I look back I'm like, why did my parents let me do this, but they did?  So I would just, spend the nights making sculptures, using the shop machines, you know, like little bits, the little table saw and lathe and stuff. And I was just messing around. 
And then, I took all those tools with me. Not the tool chest, I just got this last year. But all my handles have always been my grandfather's. So, yeah, I think their support and having grown up in this. When I was really young, my grandfather would pick me up from school. I think I was getting out of school earlier than my sisters. And I would just spend the afternoons in the basement with and he would be in his workshop. Which was so fun, I loved him. I've got his desk sign here. He was wonderful. 
I think also growing up in Cleveland, it was a really nice, quiet town and I feel like there was a lot of time to do that. 

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Nativen:   Was there a moment in your life, like an epiphany when you realized that you really seriously wanted to pursue this as a trade? 

Natalie:   Yeah, you know, it was totally unplanned. The sort of short version of the story: I was making these robotic paintings. And I was using my friend's shops to build them. I only really built one and I wanted to build more. And my father passed and I slept for six months and then I woke up and had like $1,000 dollars left. I basically had spent all the money I had and I used that money to buy my first set of machinery because I wanted to make my own robots. 
Then as soon as I had the shop, I did the same thing I did here. I rented it out to seven different people so I could keep down the cost. And then as soon as I had a shop everyone was like "oh can you build me a table? Can you build me a bench?" So I just stopped the art thing, like right then and there. It wasn't a conscious choice. ... It just happened. 
To be honest it's like my favorite thing I ever gave up in a way. Because I miss painting, but more like the mental exercise, you know? And the practice. But ... the pursuit of being a career painter is really hard. Trying to come up with that next thing. Whereas my ego isn't attached in the same way with all this stuff. 

Nativen:   Which in a way can actually be really creatively freeing because you're not associating your self worth on that really profound level. You're just like, I really enjoy this,  but if things work or don't work it doesn't feel personal in the same way? 

Natalie:   Exactly. 

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Nativen:  What do you love most about Brooklyn and do you think it's integral to the work that you're doing? 

Natalie:   I think it's integral to the work that we're doing because this project sort of started because we wanted to be able to build a store, so that I could develop my own work. And if I built a store then I could sell my own work, I could just have a platform for it. So I do think that Red Hook is very integral because it's so easy to set up something like this. There's so many people in need of a shop or a shared shop space. We have a variety of things that we have because we have wood and metal and ceramics.
 In some ways it feels like a no brainer here. I think this is sort of the first phase of this project of developing our own work off of this sort of launching pad. 

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Nativen:  Can you talk a little bit about where you're hoping to take this? 

Natalie:   I feel like I think of them as two separate projects in a way. So Supersmith, we just started the classes which we're really enjoying. The boat building class is really great and we really want to expand that. So we're supposed to take over the rest of the building, and we're looking forward to what we can do there. I think the boat building is going to be part of that. 
We're doing more events here. We’re doing seasonal supper clubs. We're doing a crab boil in June and a pig roast in July with the meat hook and tiger shark. So that's fun, we're going to do those every season. We're sort of doing more things like that to activate the community and ... bring more awareness. 
Then as far as the store goes… So my sister does ceramics and I was doing woodwork, so our plan the whole time since we came up with the whole idea of this project, probably five, six years ago. I've been developing this, now my sister, she had kids, but there older now, can step in and start taking more of a role in it. We’re planning on collaborating together to develop this line. Shook and Co. is the store, Shook Manufacturing is our little brand that we're starting. So yeah we're really looking forward to it. 
So this summer- now that we have all these classes and events happening, and we have a program to follow, now we can start working on that project. 

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Nativen:  So these are just a couple of rapid fire questions. But do you have a favorite restaurant in Brooklyn? 

Natalie:   I would probably still say Diner. We used to have our old shop on south 11th street, between Berry and Wythe, so we were just a couple blocks from Diner. And I have to say that may be the only thing I miss from Williamsburg. Really I mean that burger is out of control. 

Nativen:  Awesome. Do you have a favorite park or outdoor space in Brooklyn? 

Natalie:   That's a good one. ... I really love City Island. Which is not exactly a park, but it is an outdoor space.

Nativen:  Do you have a hidden gem in New York? 

Natalie:    A hidden gem in New York ... Gosh, Red Hook?

Nativen:  It still feels that way which is great. Even though this area is growing there's something about the combination of it still being somewhat inaccessible that creates that feeling. 

Natalie:   Yeah it really does. In Red Hook I walk Bones [Natalie's dog] to the pier with a beer. There's nothing better than that. The luxury of walking to the pier with a beer in hand at the end of the day is heaven. 

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Nativen:  What do you think is the greatest resource to your work in Brooklyn or in New York in general? 

Natalie:   I guess I would just say this community, you know? In a way, we've built a community here but it already existed. We just sort of pulled all of these incredible people together. So that is, I would say hands down the biggest resource. We have the privilege of working with so many wonderful people, not just creative and ... so intelligent but just wonderful. We really get to enjoy each other everyday which is a real gift. 

Nativen:  Inspiring, too. 

Natalie:  Yeah it's like we couldn't be luckier. So I would say that is because we can also depend on each other. When we were building the shop- this is one of the most incredible experiences of my life in a way. Zach and I, we started this project with the tiniest pile of money. So it literally was just the two of us who built everything. So we were- and it took us two years to do all of that. It was just an empty plumbing supply and we put the skylights in, we did everything. All the floors- it was just epic.   

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Nativen:   So this is the asking you to pick your favorite child question. But do you have one piece that stands out as your favorite piece? Or maybe something that was your greatest accomplishment? 

Natalie:   Again it feels like the beginning of a project. It feels like there's been so much work already but, this wasn't really the end goal yet. So I feel like that work hasn't started. So this just feels like the foundation. So I'm proud of this foundation.  
All the work before this was sort of, at this point it feels so far away. When we left the old place, I abandoned- I left all my paintings there. 

Nativen:   Oh, wow. 

Natalie:   So I don't have any anymore which is so weird. I just walked away. I was hit by a cab, I had a broken arm so I was just like "I guess I'm just going to leave you guys." In some way, it was great. A little cathartic. 

Nativen:   In just the process of your work in general, what part of your process brings you the most joy? 

Natalie:  That part when you're creating something out of nothing. That's the best part, right? I was never really going to go to grad school for painting, but I was interested in going to business school. Which at this point, I think actually just starting a business is obviously the best training you can get. But I'm really interested in that aspect, that challenge.  

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Nativen:  What part is the greatest struggle for you? 

Natalie:  The greatest struggle I guess is probably seeing things through. I think because I do enjoy so much the ideation phase. I'm like "nailed it." Will, someone else help? But then there's no one else and you're like "oh. I've gotta do this?"

Nativen:  What's one thing you've always wanted to do but haven't done yet? 

Natalie:  As it relates to this, I think the thing that I actually want to do, is develop work out of this thing. I really want to do that. I'm really looking forward to producing my own designs and making that, getting that started. 

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Nativen:  That's cool. If you weren't doing this what do you think you would be doing? 

Natalie:   Being a mom. Looking forward to that. 

Nativen:  What's one destination you have always wanted to travel to? 

Natalie:  Since I was young- and I guess I haven't thought about it in some time, but I've always felt really drawn to India. I guess, growing up my best friend was Indian. I think maybe that was part of it. ... I'm Cuban, or half Cuban and I've gone to Cuba a couple of times and now these days I kind of just need a break and all I want to do is go back to Cuba. It's all I think about is how do I get back there? That place is pretty dreamy. 

Nativen:  Cool. I don't know if you listen to music at all while you work, but is there a song you've had on heavy rotation recently or something maybe that gets your creative juices flowing? 

Natalie: That's interesting. But well, yeah I don't know. When you came in I was just listening to a little reggaeton in the morning. 

Nativen:  What's the most helpful advice you've received or what's maybe some advice that you would give to somebody who is looking to kind of build their own thing? 

Natalie:  I think this is something that I struggle with... I heard at one point, and I come back to this thought because it's hard when you don't necessarily have the means to, or you're not at the point in the business where you can sort of hand off aspects of the business. But to learn not to work for the business, but work on the business. You know? 
I think when you start, it's so easy to get bogged down with the working for. And I think that if you're not careful ... that can really hurt it. And hurt your general happiness. 

Nativen:  Do you have a hero or maybe somebody who has helped influence your work and where you've gotten to?

Natalie:  I guess I would say my father, you know. In a way he was sort of the inspiration for this whole thing. He was just a wonderful person. I loved him, we were so close. He called me everyday with a wake up call at 8:00 AM and we'd just talk all throughout. We were very close and he was wonderful and always told me to be the best me I could be. Which is so silly and of course a father is going to say that to his daughter. But he was just so loving and supportive and I think when I watch myself not being the best me, I sort of use him to check myself and consider him when I'm making choices… I think he would be excited by this project. 

Nativen:   What are three things you can't live without?

Natalie:  Bones. [Natalie’s dog] Bones is number one. I don't know, Julio I guess maybe. Is that terrible? 

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Nativen: Oh, poor Julio. 

Natalie: I mean I love him. I kind of had to learn to love him. Which I feel bad about. I don't think he had the best kitten upbringing. I really feel like I didn't know how to love him. 
I'm gonna say, I have two sisters but Cal is the one who is here. Emmy lives in Ecuador and she has four children, she's very busy. My family overall, my sister's extended family, everyone is wonderful. 
…Were you thinking objects?  My truck.  It's such a piece of shit but I love it. I just love being able to get out of here and get around. Bones and I go camping in it a lot in the summer. It's my little bit of freedom. 

Nativen:  You gotta have a getaway vehicle

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Interview by: Lily Hetzler

Photography by: Ethan Covey

This interview has been condensed & edited

all images copyright of Nativen

Greta de Parry: Woodworker, Welder, Furniture Designer

Lily Hetzler

Greta is one of the hardest working women, I know. The ultimate hands-on sculptor, she lets the playfulness of process define and refine each of her pieces.  Hearing her story about finding the creativity in the skillsets she took for granted, and the pioneering family that inspired her to get there, is a motivating one.  Greta de Parry is a natural, and her work and the story that got her here is too…

photo by Erica Gannett

photo by Erica Gannett

Nativen:    Where are you from?

Greta:    I'm from Michigan. I grew up there. My mom is from the Deep South, and my dad is from France. He is a home-builder, so I spent a lot of time on construction sites, job sites. He always had blueprints scattered across the table. Both of my parents were business owners as well, so I think that's kind of my influence. I spent a lot of time in the South and overseas. 

Nativen:    That's great. Do you think Michigan specifically influenced your work in any way? 

Greta:    It's hard to say. That's a really interesting question. I wonder if it would have been the same scenario if I was in Idaho or something, if I would have been inspired differently. I don't think Michigan the state necessarily influenced my work. More so, my teachers; I had really, really great, influential teachers at a really young age, and both my parents were super supportive of me wanting to draw all of the time. Nurturing my creative desires, whatever they were. I think it would be more people than location.  Michigan is a great state. Not to knock on Michigan at all. 

Nativen:    That’s wonderful to have people as a catalyst because it has a fluidity to it that doesn't necessarily lock you to one area of the world. Was there maybe a moment of epiphany that you came to that made you realize, "Yes, I want to be creating, woodworking," or was it just a gradual process?

photo by Alyssa Miserendino

photo by Alyssa Miserendino

Greta:    I don't think there was any ephiphanal moment that stands out. Honestly since like 2nd grade, my art teacher was like, "Greta, you should think about going to art school for college." I loved to draw and knit things and paint and all sorts of stuff. So I had my mind set from that point on going to art school. I didn't know exactly what I wanted to do because I really liked a lot of things. I did work with fine arts, charcoal was my medium in undergrad, then I did a lot of graphic design. I'm really interested in typography, and sculpture has always been there. It wasn't necessarily even at the forefront until I moved to Chicago for school.  Like say if I needed corner shelving for my dorm room or something like that, I was able to make it because of my dad. That wasn't really art per se, because it was more like a straight, “I need some storage, how do we do this efficiently? “When I moved to Chicago I took this woodworking class my very first semester. Again, I had a really good professor. I'd never taken a formal, traditional woodworking class. I've taken metal sculpture, and other sculpture and I really just loved it and it came really naturally to me, and I really cared about the process. It sort of enveloped my time and set the tone for the rest of my time at the Art Institute. Then I got a job working in the shop, as a shop tech, and after that I spent all of my time in the shop. It wasn't furniture then, it was first sculpture, and installation pieces. I started to make the furniture that I needed in my apartment, and I used my woodworking skills there. Yeah, so It really was a gradual thing, and by the end of my time at SAIC I had developed a solid skillset in wood and metal. My foundry professor, he was a former artist in residence at this program that was affiliated with the BBM with the Art Institute. He was in charge of recruiting. When I was in the program they only took one artist at a time, and it was to learn at this farm outside of the city, and work with a master craftsperson. So I was able to do that, and that was really transformational. If I hadn't done that, who knows what I would have ended up doing? I was just immersed in furniture, and I lived up there for a few years, and it's been nine years, and I share shop space with the partner who I apprenticed.

Nativen:    It's such a nice journey through your creative process, because for you, it started out as something that was sort of second nature and somewhat inherited through learning from your father. It sounds like it was a skillset that you took for granted, and then through other creative pursuits, you found the art in it again.

Greta:    Absolutely. It's so true. It's funny, when I think about this, my most successful furniture pieces, the pieces that I love the most or that people appreciate the most, every single one of those pieces came accidentally. I was either working on other projects at the time, and happened to have off-cuts, or forms that weren't working and I was trying to fix. Those are the pieces that are really beautiful. It's much more difficult for me to sit down and design a chair. That's sort of why I design. The world is saturated with so much stuff. Why put more and more unless it’s really special.

photo by Jim Prisching

photo by Jim Prisching

Nativen:    Absolutely. What do you love most about Chicago? Do you think it's integral to your work? 

Greta:    I really enjoy Chicago. It's a liveable city, there's so much going on as far as my alma mater, major shows at the art museum. There's a big solid community of woodworkers. I live in the city but then escape the city to the studio, so to have that, it's a really nice balance. At the same time, I'm not making every single piece by hand anymore, I'm working with really great local manufacturers and fabricators that help this process become way more efficient, and even more beautifully made then I was able to do by myself. They're able to develop new products, which is very exciting. I think that could happen anywhere, though. It seems like all these cities that I visit have good solid communities, which is really exciting. 

Nativen:    Do you have a favorite restaurant in Chicago? 

Greta:    That is a tough one. I love the Publican. There are so many great places in my neighborhood…. Stout is a great one in Chicago. 

Nativen:    Favorite park or outdoor space? 

Greta:    Millennium Park. 

Nativen:    Is there a hidden gem in Chicago for you? 

Greta:    Yeah, there's so many hidden gems. The neighborhoods are packed with hidden gems. I live in a great neighborhood called Wicker Park, it’s just full of dive bars with great jukeboxes, and a lot of outdoor spaces. I think it's the dive bars in Chicago. 

Nativen:    What do you think is the greatest resource to your work in Chicago? 

Greta:    I’m really close to the fabricators and manufacturers that I work with. There's an abundance of them. When I was starting to figure out how to get the steel base made for my barstools, I looked up welding companies in Chicago, and there are 50 of them. That’s an amazing resource being in the city, and if you're a person who is starting to develop a product line, that’s not made by you. Letting go of something that's like your baby, is hard enough, so it’s nice to be able to go by, and be more hands on that way. 

Nativen:    Do you have a piece that's your favorite? Or maybe it was the greatest accomplishment throughout your work thus far?

Greta:    My favorite new piece would be a bar stool called the Nico Stool. It's just really beautiful and smooth and comfortable. I just love it. My standout is definitely my Coleman barstool. You know when I look back at the evolution and the course that it's taken, because I've been making this thing for almost 7 years now. The path, where it is now and where it started, just feels good. It's a really beautiful piece, and now the process is really buttoned-up, and I make it in all these colors. 

Coleman Bar Stool

Coleman Bar Stool

Nativen:    That's a really cool thing to look at as a creator, one symbol that can imbue that evolution for you. As far as your creation process goes, what part of it brings you the most joy? 

Greta:    Definitely the prototyping, the studio time. My process always starts in the shop, instead of pen to paper first. I feel like I can draw more with my hands in it, and do a million renditions of it… it's just endless amounts of tweakage. Something else will come by way of doing one project, and then ... I'll push on that for a bit ... It definitely starts in the shop. 

Nativen:    What part of your process do you think is the greatest struggle? 

Greta:    For a while it was the reverse engineering of it. I have a background in graphic design, but studio modeling programs were just never my thing. I never got the hang of them. So translating pieces over to CAD was challenging at first. Now I have trusted people, and I have a system that works for me, because it's really essential: working with people that want to do a rendering of a space, that's how things are operating these days. 

Nativen:    If you weren't doing furniture design, what do you think you would be doing? 

Greta:    If I wouldn't have gotten my artist in residency, I was in the application process for the Peace Corps, so I think I probably would have joined the Peace Corps. Also, I love kids and I love pediatric art therapy and that sort of thing, so I think I would have either been in teaching or something academic. 

Nativen:    That actually transitions really well into my next question, which is what destination do you want to travel to next? 

Greta:    Oh my gosh, I think about this all the time… I'm planning a trip right now to Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam. That will be in the spring. I've never been to the far East, I've spent a lot of time in Europe, but I've never been anywhere in Asia. 

Nativen:    Do you think that might inspire or alter your work in any way? 

Greta:    Definitely. I'm sort of like a sponge when it comes to architecture, and design, and seeing how people integrate cultures, and how countries use objects in different ways. You're always imagining those things that you don't necessarily think of until you travel through other countries. 

Nativen:    When you're immersed in another culture, you see not just their functional evolution from an engineering standpoint, but how that interplays with the decorative elements of the culture, like in the way that they speak to each other. I don't know if you listen to music at all when you work, but do you have any songs that influence you right now? 

Greta:    I always have The Current streaming. It's a public radio station based out of Minneapolis. They play an amazing mix of music. The DJs are awesome. It's everything from Miles Davis to Die Antwerp ... It gets all the genres, and just really good music. I also have a secret love of mashup mixes, with 30 minutes of mashup dance jams that get me moving. 

Nativen:    What are 3 words that sum up your work for you? 

Greta:    Contemporary, authentic, and lasting. 

photo by Steven Sampang

photo by Steven Sampang

Nativen:    Is there anything you do with your work to specifically connect with your community? 

Greta:    I donate pieces every year to different charitable auctions. A friend of mine is part of Save the Children, which is sort of an ongoing thing. I would like to eventually root myself with an organization that I can give part of the proceeds to… I've thought so much about this, I care about trees obviously and I care about the planet, but it's kids that pull at me...

Nativen:    That's your calling? 

Greta:    Yes. 

Nativen:    What's the most helpful advice you've received? Or what's some advice maybe that you'd offer to a creative, that's looking to develop their own work? 

Greta:    I would say don't be afraid. There are a few parts of that. If it's a person that's coming and wanting to get into the shop and learn how to build stuff with their own hands and make things, the first piece of advice I would tell them is call or email carpenters or cabinet-makers in your area. Tell them you’ll clean their studio, if you can learn some things and help them in their shop. People don't turn down free labor, so it's a really nice way of learning. The second thing I would say is, don't be afraid to fail, because most of what you’ll make will be a failure, so you have to get over that hurdle. Not everything is going to be the final piece. Just make, make, make, make, make. Hone your skillset, because that's very important. 

Nativen:    That's good advice. I think culturally, we don't acknowledge that fear is a necessary part of success, that you can't have success without fear. Do you have a hero, or maybe someone who's helped influence your work in a big way? 

Greta:    My grandparents are my heroes, for sure. There are a lot of other furniture makers and designers who have inspired me I guess, but just as a whole, to the core, I think my grandparents definitely. I just like to think about them and for any hurdle that seems like a challenge, I'm like, “I got this. This is all good,”. They're such incredible hard workers. My grandfather is actually one of the leaders in Ukrainian Independence, and he fought in the Ukraine. He's a nuclear engineer, a brilliant man, and went through a lot, lost everything, to come here and they lived for their family. 

Nativen:    That's inspiring. What are three things you can't live without? 

Greta:    Coffee is definitely a big one. I can't live without coffee. 
My Action Book – it’s a really smart, beautifully designed notebook by the Behance team.  I’ve used the action method for 5 years now, it works well for my brain.
I don’t want to say my phone…. But I kind of have to say my phone.  It’s really helpful for tracking work. I’m also constantly listening to music and podcasts, so it’s kind of a lifesaver.

photo by Jim Prisching

photo by Jim Prisching

Interview by: Lily Hetzler

This interview has been condensed & edited

Ry Scruggs & Nadia Yaron: Nightwood

Lily Hetzler

For this month’s story, we sat down with the awesome duo behind Nightwood, Ry Scruggs and Nadia Yaron.

Inside their studio, they took us on a journey thru what it means to be part of a truly inspiring partnership… From scavenging industrial Brooklyn to Tree House dwelling escapes….

Nativen:  Where are you both from?

Ry:   I was born in California. I grew up in Missouri, in the Midwest, and I lived in Denver. Now, I live here.

Nativen:  Wow… US trotter.

Ry:  Yeah… Very American.

Nadia:  She loves America…. I was born in Brazil, and I grew up on Long Island, and I’ve been in Brooklyn for 15 or 16 years now, a long time now.

Nativen:   How do you think growing up in Missouri influenced your choice to start doing woodworking, Ry?

Ry:  It didn’t. [laughing] It absolutely didn’t…. Nothing. None whatsoever. It was not even a part of my early adulthood. It was totally born out of nowhere.

There are things now that I look back and say, oh yeah. I always had spacial relations… I’m really strong with that kind of stuff.  Logic and problem solving, so, those skills I’ve always had. Nothing about where I grew up had anything to do with it. For me, it felt like it came out of nowhere. I had an epiphany, and then it started.

Nadia:  Did it come out of a desire to furnish interior spaces?

Ry:  Yeah. More than anything else. It came out from a want to decorate.

a collaborative piece of wood and weaving (image taken at  Trunk  in Brooklyn)

a collaborative piece of wood and weaving (image taken at Trunk in Brooklyn)

Nativen:  Do you feel the same way, Nadia?

Nadia:  Well… I always made stuff. My mom was an art teacher so she always encouraged us to be creative and make different things… Because of that, I never took it seriously. [Like] I could do this as a job, have a living doing this.

So…When I went to college I wanted to be intellectual. I went to school for women’s studies. I got a job outside of that working on city council. I hated all of it. I basically escaped and went and lived in a tree house for a month and realized that I needed to work with my hands. That’s when I started taking it more seriously.

Nativen:  That’s a great beginning, though… I guess that answers when you realized you wanted to be [artists].

So…What do you love most about Brooklyn, and do you think it’s an integral part of your work?

Ry:  That’s a good question… I love Brooklyn. I have been to a lot of places in the US, and I can’t find anything that compares to New York in general. I don’t know if it’s now that I’m older, the city is way too overwhelming for me. Brooklyn is the nice, perfect medium between huge, overwhelming city and smaller towns.

It’s got a whole new thing now. I spent all my early 20s here and it was different for me then. It is now, too. It’s developed this whole identity and community that is this artisanal thing. Which is great, and it helped us find our identity within it, because we started doing it right around the time all of that energy was culminating here.

Although, now it’s getting maybe crazy and overdone possibly. I don’t know what it’s going to morph into next.

Nadia:  I feel like when we started, because we were literally finding wood on the streets of our neighborhood in Brooklyn, I think that our pieces really were truly a part of Brooklyn and its history. We were also taking apart old furniture from old brownstones, so I think it really was a piece of history and a piece of Brooklyn.

Ry:  The architecture of Brooklyn is very inspiring to us… Our Brooklyn apartment was one of the first catalysts for us starting to doing this. Just the beauty of the brownstone apartments and the neighborhood feeling. The history of the people and the architecture. Everything here is kind of what, I think, helped shape our aesthetic so that played a big part into it.

Nativen:  That’s great. Brooklyn’s an incredibly rich city. Culturally, and just sort of the dichotomy of industrial space with the reuse of that and beautiful architecture.

Ry:  We have lived in different neighborhoods a lot of different neighborhoods, from the industrial to the very charming and quaint. I think that it’s all played its part. It’s like different categories of art work. It definitely helps.

Nativen:  In Brooklyn, what is your favorite restaurant?

Nadia:  I think it is Isa, in Williamsburg… It is beautiful we love the woodwork and the way it is decorated its spacious and the food.

Nativen:  Do you have a favorite home goods store?

Nadia:  We go to a lot of vintage places, I feel like we kind of scavenge [laughing] everything you know.

Ry:  Yeah, it’s true…We shop at our own store… It’s hard for us. We don’t really shop for home goods that much because we make them… Moon River, we did a lot of shopping there.

Nativen: Do you have a favorite clothing store?

Ry:  Well I pretty much love vintage clothes.

Nadia:  Usually, we go to the flea market… There are these Japanese guys that have some really nice Japanese textiles and old Japanese clothing that we like to get and mend it and patch it back up…. They have really nice stuff.

Nativen:  Do you have a favorite park or outdoor space?

Nadia:  We usually just go to Fort Greene Park a lot in the mornings. We have a dog and it’s off‑leash before nine. He likes to run free like a little wild man.

Ry:  I love Fort Green Park. It’s got hills… It’s not too big. Just right.

Nativen: Is there a hidden gem in Brooklyn that you have?

Ry:  There used to be more, so, I don’t know. We use to go to a guy called Crazy Eddie.

Nadia:  There was also a guy on Carlton that it was just like a junk yard. He was like a hoarder basically. When he first started…

Ry:  He had crazy junk. You had to climb mountains. It was like an episode of “Hoarders.” It was hardcore… When we first started we got some good stuff there and we kind of furnished our apartment with stuff from him.

Nadia:  That was the gem.

Ry: The secret. You would be brave to go there.

…Local hardware stores were actually a really good resource for us because we like to use crazy, weird hardware that you get at a hardware store.  Sometimes they’ll give you old stuff. They think it’s ugly and I think it’s just perfect.

Ry:  We have lived in different neighborhoods a lot of different neighborhoods, from the industrial to the very charming and quaint. I think that it’s all played its part. It’s like different categories of art work. It definitely helps.

Nativen:  In Brooklyn, what is your favorite restaurant?

Nadia:  I think it is Isa, in Williamsburg… It is beautiful we love the woodwork and the way it is decorated its spacious and the food.

Nativen:  Do you have a favorite home goods store?

Nadia:  We go to a lot of vintage places, I feel like we kind of scavenge [laughing] everything you know.

Ry:  Yeah, it’s true…We shop at our own store… It’s hard for us. We don’t really shop for home goods that much because we make them… Moon River, we did a lot of shopping there.

Nativen: Do you have a favorite clothing store?

Ry:  Well I pretty much love vintage clothes.

Nadia:  Usually, we go to the flea market… There are these Japanese guys that have some really nice Japanese textiles and old Japanese clothing that we like to get and mend it and patch it back up…. They have really nice stuff.

Nativen:  Do you have a favorite park or outdoor space?

Nadia:  We usually just go to Fort Greene Park a lot in the mornings. We have a dog and it’s off‑leash before nine. He likes to run free like a little wild man.

Ry:  I love Fort Green Park. It’s got hills… It’s not too big. Just right.

Nativen: Is there a hidden gem in Brooklyn that you have?

Ry:  There used to be more, so, I don’t know. We use to go to a guy called Crazy Eddie.

Nadia:  There was also a guy on Carlton that it was just like a junk yard. He was like a hoarder basically. When he first started…

Ry:  He had crazy junk. You had to climb mountains. It was like an episode of “Hoarders.” It was hardcore… When we first started we got some good stuff there and we kind of furnished our apartment with stuff from him.

Nadia:  That was the gem.

Ry: The secret. You would be brave to go there.

…Local hardware stores were actually a really good resource for us because we like to use crazy, weird hardware that you get at a hardware store.  Sometimes they’ll give you old stuff. They think it’s ugly and I think it’s just perfect.

Ry: I don’t know if I would be a musician. Maybe also just something in pop culture. I love pop culture, TV, movies, celebrities, music, all of that stuff. I think that’s for me…

Nadia:  And astrology.

Ry:  Astrology too, but I don’t think that I would do that for a job. Probably one of those artistic realms of things. Entertainment based.

Nadia:  I’m more of a spiritual person.

Ry:  We know her backup plan.

Nadia:  I would go more into a… I don’t know.

Ry:  She would be a shaman. Don’t be shy.

Nadia:  Kind of. I would be more into spiritual, healing…

Ry:  Or a Buddhist monk.

Nadia:  Or I would go to a monastery, basically. I had a dream last night that we went on vacation and there was a Buddhist monastery next door. There was a monk there that was like, “Come in.” I was like, “OK, great.”

I went in and I just stayed for a week and then I went back to tell everybody that I was going back there and I was going to stay there. Like… I’ll be here, guys.

Nativen:  That’s great. That’s awesome. It’s good to have an out plan. Always in life. What destination do you want to travel to and how do you think that might inspire or alter your work, if it would?

Nadia:  I guess after this long winter, I’ve been craving tropical weather like Brazil. I wouldn’t go to Brazil. I probably would want go somewhere in Asia, like Thailand or India.

I’d love to see the textiles there, too. I love block print fabrics. I’d like to see their woven processes and things like that.

Ry:  I still don’t know where I would go.

Nadia: She likes Scandinavian….

Ry:  I do.

Nadia:  She likes very civil…

Ry:  I would probably go to… northern Europe. Basically, I like the architecture, the old European architecture. That is definitely more inspiring to me. I do enjoy the casual feeling of Island spa retreats and such… So, I would get into driftwood materials and such.  Those things would definitely be even more inspiring to my work.

Nativen:  That’s great, it’s funny how that works out; how you take on individual affinities towards a place even if you have no connection there. Maybe you do, I mean, northern Europe I clearly have a connection to, but it is, you just kind of get sucked in by your soul.

Ry:  It’s true.

Nativen:  Do you have a song that’s currently heavily on rotation?

Ry:  It’s usually a mix of things. What’s the last thing I listened to? One artist? Electrelane, I’ve been really feeling.

I listen to all kinds like cheesy pop music too. I mean, everything. Classic rock. We have a little bit different…She doesn’t include the pop music in her rapporteur.

Nadia:  I take those songs off the playlist

Ry:  I make them and she’s like, “Is this appropriate for me or not?… She’s a much more discriminating editor than I am.

Nadia:  I have been listening to podcasts while I work..I listen to Ram Dass a lot… He was a Harvard professor in the 60’s, for psychology. Then he met Timothy Leary and they started doing acid together. He went to India and became a Buddhist and Hindu. It’s just really interesting his talks and hearing…They are from the 60’s and 70’s so you just feel like you’re transported back in time.

Nativen:  That’s nice go on a journey in your own work space. I love that.

What are [a couple of] words that sum up your work?

Ry:  Well I like to think of it as being very primitive..

Actually, after going to go this design shows this past weekend and seeing everything is so finished and polished and smooth. It hardly feels natural to me.

I would say our work is very organic, as well. That’s very important to us. That’s two.

Nativen:  Great. Is there anything you do with your work to specifically connect with your community?

Nadia:  I am going to be doing a community weaving project. I am doing a woven backdrop for PS1 for summer stage. It’s going to be 16 feet by 20 feet. I’m going to get together some people and have some community weaving sessions to make it because it’s going to be very large and time consuming.

Nativen:  That’s fantastic though, that’s great.

Ry:  I more put my head down and try not to…Nadia pays attention to everything that’s going on out there in our realm of work and such. I am not as good at that. In fact, I usually prefer to keep it really in insular. Just because I work better that way.

But I do think about my clients and it’s very much more, rather than being community based, it’s very much service based. The fact that I work well trying to assess and accommodate my client’s needs and their interests and their style and that. I think a lot in terms of that, less so than the community.

I think, probably, it influences me more. Just more one on one.

Nativen:  Well that’s the community in and of itself too, just a smaller scale…

What’s the most helpful advice you’ve received, or what would you offer to creatives looking to develop their own work?

Nadia: I feel like a lot of people that are starting get bogged down on the details of the things that they need to have and the things that they need to do in order to do this.

Ry:  Like, the traditional stuff.

Nadia:  Well I need these giant tools and this giant table saw so that I can make a table. You don’t need all that stuff. Or, I need a giant floor loom so I can weave.

You don’t. I think you just need to do it.

That’s usually our advice. Just start making stuff and see what happens. Don’t get bogged down in all of the other stuff. If you’re starting a business, all that stuff that just feels so overwhelming. Like business plans and all that crap. Just start doing it and see where it takes you.

Ry:  If you’re business is creation based and you’re making something, just start making something.

Nadia:  Just start making it. That’s our advice.

Nativen:  That’s really good advice. Solid advice.

Who is your hero or someone who’s helped maybe influence your work?

Ry:  Nadia. You’re my hero

Nadia:  Oh! Really, that’s so sweet.

Ry:  I know, I am getting choked up but it’s true. I think that for me our business wouldn’t be what it is.

Nadia:  That’s so cute. Thank you.

Ry:  I try to explain that to people. That whatever we have was born because we came together.

Nadia:  We do actually inspire each other and get excited when we talk about stuff together.

Ry:  I think it might be impossible for me to do what we have done without You.

Nativen:  That’s fantastic. That is like the ideal match, right there. Amazing.

Nadia:  Do you feel like Barbara Walters now?

[laughter]

Nativen:  It’s inspiring to hear that and it’s really reassuring too… To know that you can create that together and constantly be refueling that fire.

Life is crazy and the creative journey is so crazy. There are those moments where it’s so great. Then there’s moments where you’re like, “What am I doing?” To have somebody who’s on that journey with you and reinvigorating the fire for you, it’s really powerful. It’s awesome.

Ry:  It’s also really helpful just to have somebody to talk to about all this decisions you have to make.

Nadia:  Exactly. For sure.

Nativen:  Yes, a sounding board, if nothing else, absolutely.

What are the five objects you can’t live without?

Nadia:  I need a loom of some kind. I guess then I need yarn.

Ry:  I need a television or some sort of media device that I can be entertained by.

Nadia:  We aren’t that type.

Ry:  We aren’t that object driven.

Nadia:  I think also because we make stuff too, we usually get rid of stuff. We’re not that attached to that many things. We redecorate our apartment a lot. We usually just don’t get too attached to the stuff we have. I think

Ry:  I think a home is…

Nadia:  A home. Yeah.

Ry:  …is an object I can’t live without. I would not be able to be homeless. So a home.

Nadia:  Something to play music with I guess, too.

Ry:  Yes. Whatever object that would be. Have to have music. I think the home thing is the biggest thing and then whatever is inside of it doesn’t really matter because we’ll just make it, I guess.

Interview and Photos By: Lily Hetzler

This interview has been condensed & edited

all images copywright of Nativen